Scallops Picture

Health Benefits of Scallop

  • Family: Mollusks
  • Availability: The season for fresh sea scallops and bay scallops is from October – March. Sea and Frozen scallops are available year round.

Scallops are bivalves that grow in shells, much the way oyster and clams do. Inside the scallop shaped shell is a white fleshy meat that has a delicately sweet taste. Scallops are found both in bay waters and in the sea.

The bay scallop is much smaller than the sea scallop, and the edible portion is less than an inch in diameter; usually a half-inch (about a centimeter) or smaller. The sea scallop’s can be as large as two inches (about 5 cm.) in diameter. Sea scallops are sometimes cut into smaller shapes to pass as bay scallops. Scallops are both fished and farmed (that is, cultivated in water for harvest).

They are available shucked (scallops have been removed from the shell) on board the fishing boat because they cannot survive out of water. Scallop is best served with a mild sauce of cream, cheese or butter because these will not overpower the mild flavor of the scallop.

Available form of Shucked Scallop:

  • Dry packed scallop – are scallops that are devoid of any additives.
  • Wet packed – are scallops treated with sodium tri polyphosphate. This chemical increases the weight of the scallops, by increasing the absorption of water, on freezing.

Nutrient Content of Scallops : per 85 g

  • Vitamin B12 1.3 mcg
  • Magnesium: 47.6 mg
  • Selenium: 18.8 mcg.
  • Protein: 14.3g
  • Carbohydrates: 2.0g
  • Fat: 0.65 g
  • Calories: 75

Health Benefits of Scallops:

  • Scallop can help promote cardiovascular health and give protection against colon cancer.
  • Sea scallops are an excellent source of  vitamin B12, which helps in the formation of red blood cells.
  • Scallops are rich source of omega 3 fatty acids which helps ease symptoms of premenstrual syndrome, slows the growth of cancerous tumors, helps prevents arthritis and helps combat skin disorders.
  • Scallop is a good source of potassium and magnesium.
  • Scallop is also a good source of selenium which helps neutralize the injurious effects of free radicals.

Buying tips:

  • Fresh live scallops in the shell are slightly opened, but will close slightly when pinched. They smell like the sea, not strong and fishy.
  • The color of fresh scallops are ivory to light pink, while a pure white scallops may have been soaking in tripolyphosphate to make them appear plumper. Brown or dull-looking scallops are just too old.

Storing tips: To store scallops, unwrap, place in a bowl covered with a wet paper towel, and refrigerate, prepare, and eat them the same day.

Store frozen scallops, double wrapped, in the freezer for up to two months.

How to Cook Scallop:

  • The secret to successful scallop cooking is to not overcook them because excessive cooking increases the toughness of the scallops.
  • Trim off any tough connective tissue. If any roe is attached, leave it on the piece and cook along with the scallop.
  • Fresh live scallops in the shell are slightly opened, but will close slightly when pinched. They smell like the sea, not strong and fishy.
  • The color of fresh scallops are ivory to light pink, while a pure white scallops may have been soaking in tripolyphosphate to make them appear plumper. Brown or dull-looking scallops are just too old.

Storing tips: To store scallops, unwrap, place in a bowl covered with a wet paper towel, and refrigerate, prepare, and eat them the same day. Store frozen scallops, double wrapped, in the freezer for up to two months.

Cooking tips:

  • The secret to successful scallop cooking is to not overcook them because excessive cooking increases the toughness of the scallops.
  • Trim off any tough connective tissue. If any roe is attached, leave it on the piece and cook along with the scallop.

“This post was originally published on January 14, 2012 @ 06:52”